Mindanao Deep and Deuterium for Clean Energy

Mindanao Deep Deuterium
The Philippine Trench (also Philippine Deep, Mindanao Trench, and Mindanao Deep) is a submarine trench to the east of the Philippines.

It has a length of approximately 1,320 km (820 mi) and a width of about 30 km (19 mi) from the centre of the Philippine island of Luzon trending southeast to the northern Maluku island of Halmahera in Indonesia.

The Philippine Trench deepest point, the Galathea Depth, has a depth of 10,540 metres (5,760 fathoms; 34,580 feet), the third deepest in the world. Galathea Depth was explored by the Danish ship Galathea, from where the name is taken during the Galathea Deep Sea Expedition in 1950-1952.

Immediately to the north of the Philippine Trench is the East Luzon Trench. They are separated, with their continuity interrupted and displaced, by Benham Plateau on the Philippine Sea Plate. The Benham Plateau, also known as the Benham Rise, is a seismically active undersea region and extinct volcanic ridge located in the Philippine Sea approximately 250 km (160 mi) east of the northern coastline of Dinapigue, Isabela.

The Philippine Trench is the result of a collision of tectonic plates. The Philippine Sea Plate is subducting under the Philippine Mobile Belt at the rate of about 16 cm (6.3 in) per year.

There is large commercial interest in mining deep-sea hydrothermal vents for minerals. One is Deuterium and can be found in the Philippine Trench near the province of Surigao del Norte, Philippines.

Uncommon amounts of Deuterium, an isotope also known as heavy hydrogen, reside in the water at the bottom of the Philippine Trench. To get it, all you have to do is cruise out 170 miles east of the Philippines and bring water up from the ocean floor, about 6.5 miles below the surface.

Deuterium pumped from the Philippine Trench could be processed “into a high-potent but environmentally friendly fuel that would eventually replace conventional or fossil fuel gas.”

More about Deuterium and its potential, read “Imelda Marcos Has an $829 Billion Idea